Month: August 2016

  • Leaving Diyarbakir

    It’s 1957. You’re an American geologist in Turkey. I won’t be born for another 30 years, and you’re my grandfather. It’s nearly evening near a border crossing, after leaving Diyarbakir earlier in that day. (It was in near Diyarbakir that you took the photo above, of some goat skin rafts.) You’re with your friend and coworker, looking to […]

  • Talent development

    Patricia Bellinger, executive director of Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership, offers important perspective on the value of nonprofit talent development: I’m struck by the greater focus on talent development in the corporate world because such a high percentage of nonprofits provide people-intensive services. The truth is that investment in talent isn’t always expensive.…

  • Three places for stronger culture

    Yancey Stickler talks about “a monied imperialism of changing local cultures” that prioritizes safe financial bets over more vibrant and perhaps more volatile but meaningful community life. This is the “imperialism” of thousands of Bank of American branches replacing thousands of old, local New York City businesses. It’s really heard to talk about and it’s…

  • Far better people than you have died

    Sententiae Antiquae, an online commonplace book, translates Lucretius, De Rerum Natura: Add as well the friends of the Muses whose single Homer, the sceptered lord, has been quieted in sleep like the rest. Democritus, too, when advanced age finally warned him That the moving memories of his mind were fading, He freely offered his own head to…

  • Tradition, a sort of time travel

    The election of the ancient kings of the Roman Kingdom (753BC-509BC) followed a process that in many respects is carried on in the Christian elevation of the pope: Whenever a king died, Rome entered a period of interregnum. Supreme power of the state would devolve to the Senate, which was responsible for finding a new king. The…