The next America

Angelo Codevilla’s “After the Republic” paints a portrait of an America in a moment of great risk. This is a “sustained moment,” however—sort of like a snowflake that gradually falls from the sky, but ultimately settles in precisely such a way that it finally starts an avalanche: No one running for the GOP nomination discussed the greatest…

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LaSalle reduces tuition

I learned yesterday that LaSalle University is reducing tuition 29% next year, bringing annual tuition down to ~$29,000 from ~$40,000: “The cost of higher education continues to spiral year after year, with no end in sight,” said La Salle President Colleen Hanycz. “We cannot continue to assume that this issue will fix itself someday, somehow—the tuition…

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All things are vanity

Beautiful and true, from Saturday’s reading in Ecclesiastes: Rejoice, O young man, while you are young and let your heart be glad in the days of your youth. Follow the ways of your heart, the vision of your eyes; Yet understand that as regards all this God will bring you to judgment. Ward off grief…

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Back from Africa

From someone who spent five years abroad and 17 months in Africa: these are the sentiments you are supposed to experience when you come back from africa. reverse culture shock: economic shock. the change from poverty to wealth, i was told, is harder than the other way around, than adjusting to the difficulties and trials of life…

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High infrastructure societies

Jon Evans writes: Until recently, I would have used “developed world” and “developing world” rather than “high-infrastructure” and “low-infrastructure.” However, now that the vast majority of the world’s poorest people do not live in poor countries, I’m not sure the first two phrases are meaningful any more. There’s more parity than there has been in the…

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Catholic credit unions

I came across this story about St. Ann parish’s credit union in the summer and have been meaning to share it for a while. A Catholic parish running its own credit union is something new to me, although I’ve since spoken to some priests who say it was more common in the 20th century in some places. …

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Lincoln’s poetry

Earlier this month in Washington I ran along the National Mall to the Lincoln Memorial. I remembered being in Washington in 2010. I visited the World War II Memorial and found in a gift shop someplace near there Poems of Abraham Lincoln, a little book. Who knew Lincoln was a poet? We’re living in a time when our political…

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History changes

After watching Bruce Schneier’s talk a particular comment of his has stayed with me. Schneier emphasizes that we’re “bad at predicting our social future.” Amidst the constants of life, death, taxes, etc. our social and cultural environment is always changing in unexpected ways. This is true of the Nittany Valley, though I think it tends to be difficult…

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Fraying edges

I think it’s healthy to have a few mental topics that you can return to again and again throughout life, thinking through challenges and opportunities, turning them over in your mind, working through them, etc. One of those topics for me is college and life in college towns. It’s why I’ve stayed involved with Penn State,…

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Changing bioethics

Wesley Smith writes on the direction of Western bioethics: If you want to see what is likely to go awry in medical ethics and public healthcare policy, pay attention to the advocacy of bioethicists—at least of those who don’t identify themselves as “conservative” or “Catholic.” In their many journal articles and presentations at academic symposia,…

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