John Stanton died three years ago.

John was a founder of the Pro-Life Union of Greater Philadelphia, but far more than that, he was a good man. I knew of him for years, and got to know him in his final years as a fellow Pro-Life Union board member.

John and his wife Harriet helped create the Pro-Life Union as husband and wife, and its continuing mission is imbued by their insight that the Culture of Life has always been larger than any single issue—their work began in the years leading up to the consequential 1971 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, and the Pro-Life Union’s work continues to impact lives across Greater Philadelphia through its efforts for alternatives, public affairs, outreach, and education.

I joined the board in January 2012 to assist in developing the Pro-Life Union’s governance structure, along with its brand, content, and communications. The history and depth of impact of the organization over the decades continues to impress me, and reminds me of the need and importance of personal action. Putting aside the intellectual and ethical debate over how America determines the worth of human life, there will always be people in need and in situations requiring real assistance.

In just the past few years, an enormous portion of our budget has directly supported men, women, and children in crisis situations. This sort of practical charity typifies the Pro-Life Union’s culture of witness and service over fraught ideological arguments—and John & Harriet’s personal, living example continues to guide how our mission translates into reality.

It was in November 2014 that Fr. Chris Walsh announced the John & Harriet Stanton Culture of Life Endowment Fund, a modest way we continue to honor the Stanton’s spirit. We endowed this fund with the Catholic Foundation of Greater Philadelphia, and continue to build it up. Its purpose is to support internships and training for new generations of servant leaders.

Tyhisha Hudson spoke in November 2014 about the Pro-Life Union’s impact on her family: “The Pro-Life Union was not just about preserving the life of the child. It also was about preserving family—husband and wife.”

Real communities support a robust family life, with parents at the heart of the home. It starts with a Culture of Life and is realized in practice through a real spectrum of choice.