Learning through encounter

Basil Chad Chisholm writes that when college disappoints, it’s worth starting a fraternal club that intentionally expands your world/mental range: In the Classical Age of learning in ancient Greece, Plato argued that true education not only conveyed to us a right knowledge but also taught us to desire those things that are right and good. By…

Published

Subjective human rights

Mike May interviews Wesley J. Smith, board member of the Terri Schiavo Life & Hope Network, and Wesley conveys some of the fundamentals that inform our mission: How do you see these issues and any other trends that are occurring as undermining human dignity? When you say that some people have greater value than other…

Published

Science deniers

Keith Stanovich is author of The Rationality Quotient and emeritus professor of applied psychology and human development at the University of Toronto. He writes: As a political strategy, this “party of science” labelling might be effective, but epistemic superiority cannot simply be declared on the basis of a few examples. A cognitive scientist is forced to…

Published

Work ethic

K. E. Colombini writes: Sasse laments the loss of a hard-work ethic, founded on a chore schedule, and its impact on a generation of younger Americans. He encourages parents to get back to basics when it comes to pushing their kids into harder summer jobs, especially outdoor jobs. Similarly, former Dirty Jobs host Mike Rowe…

Published

Big little historical moments

Stanislav Petrov died at 77 earlier this year. Why am I remembering him? His incredible discretion and right judgment in an incredible historical moment: On September 26, 1983, Soviet military officer Stanislav Petrov received a message that five nuclear missiles had been launched by the United States and were heading to Moscow. He didn’t launch…

Published

Natural law’s origins

Bradley J. Birzer writes on Christopher Dawson’s thinking as an historian and meta-historian on natural law: Certainly, the moment-by-moment unfolding and detailing of the past mattered, but only as these served as a means to understand the larger currents of thought and the human condition. It was the sea changes in thought and consciousness across…

Published

Penn State v. Iowa

An entire game unfolded in four seconds at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City last night, as Penn State somehow defeated Iowa 21-19 as time expired with an incredible just-above-the-defender’s-fingertips reception: I was on the phone as the fourth quarter wound down, and had lost hope that Penn State had any chance of winning the game…

Published

Liquid modernity

Rod Dreher introduced the concept of “liquid modernity” into my life through his Benedict Option book. Dreher writes a bit about liquid modernity in light of Sen. Ben Sasse’s recent remarks: This weekend I am at an event called The Gathering, for Christian philanthropists. … Yesterday I heard a wonderful lunchtime address by Sen. Ben…

Published

Hurricane wine cellar

A great story amidst so much of Hurricane Irma’s tragedy is Richard Branson making the most of things, emerging “from wine-cellar bunker after Irma ‘utterly devastated’ his private island:” Sir Richard Branson, the billionaire founder of the Virgin Group who said he would ride out Hurricane Irma on his private Caribbean island, has emerged from…

Published

Appreciation Dinner

I visited St. Anthony of Padua Catholic parish in Ambler, Pennsylvania tonight for the Pro-Life Union of Greater Philadelphia‘s Annual Appreciation Dinner for Christian volunteers. As a board member wrapping up my sixth year, it’s particularly gratifying to be a part of events like this and see the oldest and the youngest generations coming together…

Published